19 May 2014

Digital Spring Cleaning




Time for spring cleaning!

Spring is almost here! Now is a good time for spring cleaning for your computer and mobile phone.Yes, physical cleaning is important – blowing out the dust and wiping off the keyboard, but don’t forget about cleaning out your data. Are there apps on your phone you can get rid of? Apps that you tried and didn’t like? How about those documents on your computer? Are there drafts or duplicates that can be deleted? Too many bookmarks in your browser? Find out which ones are still relevant and let the others go. Need help tackling this? Contact an expert!

 

9 May 2014

Digital excuses




Excuses and excuses for digital clutter

 

Do any of these excuses sound familiar?

  •  “I might need that someday!”
  •  “I could use that again if I started doing such-and-such.”
  •  “It’s worth so much money, I can’t just get rid of it.”
  •  “But so-and-so gave that to me, and I don’t want to hurt their feelings.”
  •  “That’s what I have to remember so-and-so by!”
  •  “I like it, I just don’t have a place to put it yet. But when I move…”

digital disorganization

We often use the same excuses in the digital world that we do in the “physical stuff” realm.

What other excuses do you have for hanging on to digital items you might no longer need?

24 March 2014

Spring Cleaning for your computer




Have you cleaned your downloads folder lately?

For Windows users, most everyone will find a Downloads folder on their system. This is where you computer usually saves items downloaded from the Internet such as installs for programs, images, documents etc. Anything you click on to download usually ends up here.

A regular cleaning of those folder will help free up space on your computer, but it will also make it easier to find new things you download – saving you time!

Is there junk in your folder that can go away?
Photo from Barret Anspach CC BY 2.0

31 October 2013

Tag! You’re it!




How often have you saved a file – a document, a photo, a music clip – then promptly lost track of where exactly it went? Or maybe you are trying to find that Excel report you created for last year’s medical expenses. Depending on your organizing system, just looking in folders and on your desktop might not do the trick.

Have you considered using tags as another way to organize your digital files? This is a method of using keywords or descriptive words to label a document. While it might be easy to put all documents and files relating to your upcoming vacation in the same folder. But what if some of those documents also relate to a business trip? It is usually not advisable for a document to ‘live’ in more than one place.

This is where tags can come in handy. Another word for tags is keywords.

A real life example would involve my music collection. I have mp3’s of music featured in the show Supernatural. Originally, all this music lived in the folder called ‘Supernatural Music’. However, I ran into trouble when I merged folders with my husband who organizes his music by performer. It made sense to change my set up, however, I knew that if I lost my ‘Supernatural Music’ folder, I would never remember all the songs that belonged there. So first, I tagged each mp3 with the keyword ‘Supernatural Music’, then I moved those songs into their appropriate performer folders. Now when I want to listen to music from Supernatural, I can just search by ‘Supernatural’ and all those tagged files should show up.

Ready to try it out yourself?

There are two ways you can attach tags to a document:
1. While you are creating the file. In most programs (Word, Excel etc.) once you have a document open you go to the ‘File’ menu choice, then select ‘Properties’ from the options. This displays a pop up window which allows you to add author name, title, comments, and keywords. You would enter the keywords of choice, then ‘Ok’ which takes you back to your document. On a Mac, you would enter your tag choices under ‘Comments’. Mac Screenshot
2. You can also attach tags to a document after you have created it – say the next day, next week, etc. To add tags in this manner, you find the file you are interested in tagging. Right click the file, which will bring up a short options list. Again, go to ‘Properties’, then ‘Details’, then add your keywords. On a Mac, you would again right click the file, select ‘Get Info’, then add your keywords under ‘Spotlight Comments’. Tagging Files

Tags are a great way of organizing when you have items that fit in ‘more than one bucket’. By tagging a file, you can store it in one place, but access it in a variety of ways.

Questions? As always, just give us a call!

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